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IoT World 2016 favorites

My personal favorites at the IoT World Conference

Samsung

I am very impressed by the Samsung Artik

Looks like they are way ahead of competition in terms of understanding of how complete IoT solution should look like. Artik looks like a good platform and ecosystem that includes hardware modules, API specs, cloud, and growing community of developers. 

Reference device implementations based on different Artik Modules

Reference implementation of sensors and detectors


ARTIK 5 Dev kit

OTTO robot

ARTIK1 module and dev kit

Another dev kit (complete with WiFi connectivity)





Arduino

Arduino for IoT.  It is not as complete as ARTIK but it is open, has a large developer community (myself included),  and working on a MQTT message-based cloud. All the rights components for a big success story! 





Here is the right way to demo an IoT solution (based on Raspberry Pi)




Jaguar 

This company really understand usability! Do not know much about Jaguar driving experience but product design is simply amazing!



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